About your Search

20120930
20121008
STATION
CSPAN 7
CSPAN2 4
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
CNN 2
CNNW 2
KQED (PBS) 2
WETA 2
KRCB (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 34
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
control. >> the numbers are wrong to begin with. we act redoubled our national debt under george w. bush. when you were working for him, i believe. the war in a iraq and afghanistan and bush tax cuts -- we doubled our spending under george bush. we continue to add during the obama years, but had to deal with the iraq and afghanistan wars and the bush tax caps -- cuts that were never paid for. the support president obama as are commanded -- commander in chief? do you believe he is the united states citizen? you accept the fact the columns of the christian? >>-- he called himself a christian? >> that was three questions. i will say, of course barack obama is our commander in chief. i wish he were a stronger commander in chief. >> to you believe in the? >> let him finish, please. you posed the question. >> i wish he were a stronger commander in chief. in recent weeks, we saw the tragedy of the assassination of -- >> let him finish. >> ok. >> they are simple questions. >> i.n.d. stand you would like to put meat on the cross examination stage. if you would like a -- >> i'll give you about 20
of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney because there is an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. he is from a university in fairfax, virginia. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is that a really good debate would be characterized by some depth of clash and arguments back and forth between the two. a lot of that is missing from presidential debate. the testing of ideas comes from that c
with. we act redoubled our national debt under george w. bush. when you were working for him, i believe. the war in iraq and afghanistan and bush tax cuts -- we doubled our spending under george bush. we continue to add during the obama years, but had to deal with the iraq and afghanistan wars and the bush tax cuts that were never paid for. the support president obama as our commander in chief? -- and do you support president obama as our commander in chief? do you believe he is a united states citizen? do you accept the fact that he calls himself a christian? >> that was three questions. i will say, of course barack obama is our commander in chief. i wish he were a stronger commander in chief. >> to you believe in the? >> let him finish, please. you posed the question. >> i wish he were a stronger commander in chief. in recent weeks, we saw the tragedy of the assassination of -- >> let him finish. >> ok. >> they are simple questions. >> i understand you would like to put me on the cross examination stage. if you would like a -- >> i'll give you about 20 seconds, then we will move on. >
was appointed by bill carolina tochb and was in that post on 9/11. george w. bush later named him cia director, a job he left 23 days after obama came into office. he's now an adviser to the romney campaign. welcome back to the show, general hayden. >> good morning, fareed. thank you. >> there are two possibilities, one, that this is a bunch of bad guys, militants, that got lucky. the other is this is a systematic campaign perhaps directed by one of the major al qaeda affiliates, if not al qaeda central. you know, this is, in fact, a -- you know, the execution of a long planned attack against the united states. which do you think seems more plausible? >> well, fareed, this is all fuzzy and it's just not fuzzy in our analyst. it's fuzzy in real life. if you look at al qaeda, i'll give you three tears. you gievet al qaeda prime still in pakistan and the border. i think we both agree they are not what they used to be an probably never will be. then you've got the al qaeda affiliates in the arabian pence will and then the al qaeda inspired. frankly, i think this attack was conducted by a group tha
? >> quite honestly, because he said yes. there were no shortage of press for george w. bush. i do not think we ever interviewed with him. he may have been interviewed once. but there is always -- the roles of the game, to request an interview with the president, whoever it may be. the obama people and obama himself like to get on the air. >> it has got a bigger audience than any other -- >> pretty much. you certainly get access to and engaged part of the population. >> do you ever worry about being the used? >> of course. you always worry about being used, but the presumption always is that at the same time you are using them. patsiest going to be for any administration, and i do not think we ever have been. >> i want to run video of don hewitt. how many years to do know him? >> i knew him from the very beginning of my life at cbs, 1964. he was the executive producer of cbs evening news, the cronkite news, when i joined. shortly after he was fired, and was in a kind of limbo or siberia for a couple of years. i did a documentary for them in 1968. don was the nominal executive producer. so i
a more effective version. as we carry on george w. bush's policies. on israel i think some of the romney charges are accurate. the fact is that the president has gratuitously alienated the prime minister of israel on an issue frankly was not relevant, which was settlements. and i don't think, unlike bill clinton, and george w. bush, that this president has the kind of emotional sensitivity that think is required to create some measure of partnership with the israelis even though netanyahu is a difficult guy. on syria, look, let's be clear. we're coming off the two longest wars in american history. the last thing we need is another military adventure that isn't thought through very clearly. on iran, no matter who is president we have got big trouble coming. israelis rightly need to figure out a way to prevent iran from enriching uranium. the question is, whether or not you can do that short of war? and right now, neither barack obama nor mitt romney, nor benjamin netanyahu have answers to that. so --. >> brought us through some very important regions in the middle east and it is such a bi
, not one country in which relations are healthier or more constructive than under george w. bush, and that was a pretty low standard. >> bill: what do you say, colonel hunt? >> i think the specificity of the policy when you look at libya in which we wanted a lower american profile with the weakest profile we've had security since 1979 first ambassador we had killed failed. in afghanistan issues we have people training, killing us. that is not -- and the surge was supposed to crush the taliban. the commander on the ground reports says the taliban is back. he talked about al-qaeda. >> bill: the taliban really we want away. let's look at afghanistan and iran in particular and then libya at the end of the discussion. in afghanistan, you have a lot of friendly so-called friendly, but it's really taliban fanatics infiltrating because as one of the soldiers told me last week, you can buy afghan army uniforms at any marketplace in afghanistan. they're around. so if you want to dress up like an afghany soldier and you're a taliban or al-qaeda terrorist, you can do that and walk in and blo
the only one you can really argue that did was george w. bush and al fore in 2000, even gerald ford a story people like to tell, ford fell more behind before the debate that doesn't mean the debates couldn't be a decider in this election, of course they could, but i think we should to into it with fairly low expectations of how much they will move the polls until we see otherwise. >> rose: exactly. point well-taken. on the other hand, one of the things that was beginning to creep in was this was not winnable, i don't think people came out of last night thinking it wasn't winnable, do you? >> i agree. >> i think in a macro sense of three big things he accomplished, he, for a good long while, at least for the next debate he eliminated thi concern among republicans this thing isn't winnable. and two is, i think he showed people what he is like. >> rose: right. >> more than he ever had. he didn't do it at the convention well enough, it is hard to do in fizzing, it is hard to do even on this program, because the audience, the prepressure of the debate i think he really did and the other thing he
. john mccain beat barack obama 55-43 among white voters. george w. bush, in 2000, beat al gore among white voters 55-43. the margin was the same. how did gore and bush is essentially tied? you might not know this, but bush won the election. [laughter] in the electoral college, a cool thing that is in the constitution. eight years later, what was ssentially a popular vote tie becomes 87-point below. fred talks about how hard it is for a democrat to win a seven- point margin. republicans cannot. it is impossible. if mitt romney wins the popular vote, it will be by .02, if at all. the party has to figure out how to do much better with minority voters. african-americans, it will be hard for us to get their vote for a while because the president is black. republicans have to do significantly better than we are doing right now. in the future, we have to do significantly better with latino voters. >> the republican political model is not sustainable, the current one. it has to change. one technical question -- when i look at various polls, and a lot of times the top numbers look very reason
" ♪ ] mitt romney less popular than george w. bush according to a poll. >> that's awful. >> stephanie: he hasn't even done anything yet. he's like the worst president ever. we were just assuming he would be worse. wow. new bloom beg news poll, bush has a 46% favorablerating. romney has a 43%. [ wah wah ] >> stephanie: that's really hard to do. wowee. just his campaign is already worse than bush presidency. yikes! let's go to -- where are we? patrice in oakland on "the stephanie miller show." hi patrice. >> caller: hey stephanie. >> stephanie: hi. >> caller: i believe that -- like i said, in the past before, i think the debates are going to expose romney. all of these so-called zingers or whatever he's going to come up with, if he's relying on zingers to help him score some points, that's idiotic. and not only that but i believe that obama's going to defend his record and he's going to defend it proudly. the one that's going to be on the defensive is going to be romney. and i expect obama to be very aggressive
to george w. bush, and i wrote a column about the four years she was in office. and it's my judgment that ann richards was an awfully good governor, and so i think i closed that column by saying, 'good on ya.' c-span: what makes you a good governor? >> guest: well, as i say, in our state we have the weak governor system, so that really not a great deal is required of the governor, not necessarily to know much or do much. and we've had a lot of governors who did neither. ann, i think, was one of our more effective governors, although in the odd way of american politics i'm--i'm not sure i could point to a whole lot that she actually got done. it was mostly a matter of keeping bad things from happening. and one of the main reasons she lost the governorship was because she vetoed the conceed handgun bill. and we've got a bunch of gun nuts in texas who are bound and determined that they should be able to march around with concealed weapons. c-span: what's a gun nut? >> guest: somebody who loves guns--loves guns; think that that's just the most important thing in the whole world. c-span:
states. the other factor is that john mccain beat barack obama 55-43 among white voters. george w. bush in 2000 beat al gore among white voters 55-43. the margin is the same. so how did gore and bush essentially tied -- you might not have noticed, bush won that election -- [laughter] in the electoral college to a cool thing in the constitution. 8 years later, what what had been a popular vote tie it becomes a blowout. for mitt romney to win the popular vote, it is going to be by a point or two, if he wins at all. what that says that if we don't as a party figure out how to do much better with minority voters, particularly latinos -- african-americans, it will be hard to get more than 5% of their vote for a while, since the current president is black. they will vote for him. it is understandable. republicans have to do significantly better than we doing right now and in the future we have to do significantly better with latino voters. >> i think it is fair to say that republicans -- if you talk about the business model, the republican political model is not sustainable, the current one.
was on the shortlist for consideration for george h.w. bush and she told me that when she found that out and that there is polling being done, where she was like a top choice of a lot of people nationally, but she has to have her name removed and she did because she had really disagreed with the president, with reagan several times and she knew bush would follow similar policy. she really felt like a president needed someone who he could agree with and that they would have enough differences of opinion that it would not be comfortable for him or for her. so she was through for that reason. >> okay. very good. before that want to highlight, senator dianne feinstein. >> kathleen hall jamieson is the former dean of the school of communication at the university of pennsylvania. she is a prolific scholar and several years ago she wrote i think a very good book, which outlines a number of finds that women in iran and then run for public office. and dianne feinstein was i think amazingly able to overcome most of these double bonds. for example, although early in her career, in san francisco, as
sununu, former chief of staff under george h.w. bush. good to have you on. thank you. as for the president, the campaign says mr. obama did what he set out to do. >> was he satisfied with his performance? >> well like i, i've said before, presidents never is satisfied with his performance. he is always challenging himself and he will, this, he will review it. if he wants to make some changes in the next debate he will do so. what he was satisfied with that he went and told the american people the truth and i think is fairly well-convinced that governor romney didn't meet that standard. jon: so to be fair and balanced here is ben labolt, the obama for america national press secretary. let me read you a quote from maggie haberman at "politico". >> sure. jon: post-debate the president's campaign was spinning valiantly in the media center that no mistake among democratic operatives here and in other states that obama blew it. if that is the thinking of the mainstream media, how do you try to counter that notion? >> well, listen, governor romney delivered a great work of p
leader mitchell was involved in 1990 in the clean air act in this was a letter from george h. w. bush thanking him for his collaboration and succeeding in getting that legislation passed. the 1990 amendment was important for us today. we pay $4 a gallon for gas. it was the amendment that discussed the composition of gas and the introduction of chemicals during certain seasons of the year in order to make cleaner air. and then a sample of mitchell's writing style. there are their researchers to come because they are interested in particular topics but there are also people who come because they are interested in particular techniques or purchase. some people are interested in mitchell's papers because of his negotiating skills for instance and so this is a research question that bridges a variety of the series of records that we have. others are interested in his rhetoric, how much he was really involved in writing the speeches. obviously all politicians have speechwriters which is evident of how intimately he was involved in the writing process as draft after draft goes through and he
or the other. george w. bush looking at his watch in the town hall format was seen to be a violation of the democratic connection. he looked like he had someplace better to be there reporting to citizens. he did not seem to connect with people. someone brought up all gore in 2000. -- brought up al gore in 2000. on of the other hand we have had canada to overdo it on the leadership side a good example was 1976 when gerald ford claimed there was not soviet domination of eastern europe, something that got spun in the next news cycle so it became important. he did not seem like he had ideas good enough to be a leader. most recently, john mccain seemed to moffett on the leadership side before he even got to the debate by being willing to or suggesting the debate be canceled or postponed so they could stay in washington and work on the bailout project. that made him look and l unleaderly and did not seem to be able to handle multiple problems at once. for me, and i think this will be important this particular year, our candidates, office of problems. no one doubts obama can relate to the p
to 2008 when it went from george w. bush to obama in 2008? is so then using that framework, we did a, i did a road trip over the summer stopping in colorado, iowa, wisconsin, ohio and then later florida, and with that kind of baseline kind of knowledge of who the voters i was looking for, where are the places to go, then it was just, you know, man on the street on steroids. and i was walking around, you know, shopping centers and diners and university campuses and office parks and trying to just get the stories of voters who weren't showing up at campaign rallieses, who were just going about their daily lives and asking them about, you know, how they were thinking about themselves politically, what were the stories that they were paying attention to in the election, what weren't they paying attention to. and from that kind of met some characters that i've since returned to and kind of gotten a sense of how their takes on the race have shifted over the last several months. um, and so, so ity that what is valuable in that it's very, youu know, it's the danger as a reporter, i mean, every
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)